Your past blocks your path

Don’t look behind for your past; it’s ahead of you blocking your path.

Patrick Ball (patrickball.com)

Justice, our comedy of errors

Ambrose Bierce, in The Devil’s Dictionary (1914), defined Justice as a “commodity.”  He might just as well have called it a “comedy,” as in a comedy of errors, particularly the kind of justice observable in the democracy of his time through ours, and on, apparently, into the future.

Yes, justice is a commodity because it is bought and sold.  (Anyone who requires examples has been living in a cave with an ostrich.)  Which makes of justice a comedy because it is a ludicrous rendition of it’s original home among its siblings: fairness, fair play, fair-mindedness, equity, even-handedness, impartiality, objectivity, neutrality, disinterestedness, honesty, righteousness, and morality.

Will this ever change?  Doubtful, but the name of Justice should be changed to something like, ummm, Marketice, or perhaps Commodice.  Any ideas out there in the land of people who like honest words?

Modern problems: a Chaplinesque

I am so fed-up with computer-type crap, such as failures and glitches and GOTCHAS (my name for so-called easy to add-on and use programs and apps which take endless hours to either get working or get rid of).  They tap-tap-tap my furious button to the point where, if I add/change anything, I’m just waiting for something to go wrong that will cost me dearly in time, money, and hair follicles.

When I watch pre-1980 movies, my nostalgia-gene homes in on the absence of computers, cell-phones, the WWW.HTTP.XYZ, etc.  Yeah-yeah, without personal computers we wouldn’t be able to clabgerate the folderoll and other neat things humanity never thought of doing until Hi-Tech showed us what we could do, even if we didn’t want to, but we should because everyone else is, and you don’t want to get left behind, heaven forfend.

Life would be calmer and more enjoyable without all this computer stuff (originally flogged as a time-saving devise, ha-ha), though I’d be back to the old carbon copy and white-out routine—Does anyone under 25 even know what that was?— which I could still do, of course, although the world would pay even less attention to me than it does now.  Oh, woe am I.

Please don’t call me Luddite; I prefer Chaplinesque.

Anyway, that’s how I feel this first Sunday in August.

How do you handle computer/software/cloud woes?

Fess up, Mitt…and others!

Should Mitt Romney reveal his taxes for at least 10 years?

Absolutely, they ALL— anyone running for public office—should reveal their financial situations and how they got there and certainly where they’re hiding how much.  We’re their gol-dang bosses — so the myth goes.

We should make them undergo the Milgram Test.  Strap them to a shock generator—a real one— and ask them questions about their finances, who they influence and who influences them and with what prizes and goodies or simple cash.  The first lie earns them a little shock.  For each subsequent lie, the juice is turned up another notch or three.  Video the whole process and show it on YouTube every night.  What an audience it would get!  The networks would be reduced to showing re-runs of Mr. Ed the Talking Horse, Sky King, Soupy Sales, etc.  Or maybe re-runs of America’s Got Talent.

Here’s something else that has scratched at my craw for many, many moons:   What’s with  this  ritual of referring to Senators, etc.  as “The Honorable…?”  Where lies the basis for this verbal genuflection?  Why do we have to think of those elected to national office so royally while they’re in office, if not forever more?   We know that 73.472% of our elected Congress-slugs are as honest as a 2.9-Penny Opera.  Who granted them this honorific of “The Honorable…?”  Likely some earlier self-serving, back-scratching, beady-eyed version of Congress.

Wow, that felt good!